Libraries, higher education, print culture and more.


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Oct 1, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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Oh man, this combines several of my favorite things!

Oh man, this combines several of my favorite things!

(Source: popsgoesthepenguin, via continuants)


Link

Oct 1, 2014
@ 11:28 am
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Question! Where do you learn the most current/appropriate language for diversity in race/sex/gender etc? »

thelifeguardlibrarian:

I’ve asked this before but only a couple resources were mentioned. They aren’t teaching us this stuff in library school (or at least not when I was in class) and so I’m wondering where librarians should be going to learn more. Language and vocabulary is always so key to generating dialogue and…

I’m thinking about how this question has to be a starting point. Language is important, but it always comes with a history and a context. It’s not just about knowing the right words, it’s about understanding where those words come from, and why they’ve been chosen. 

And of course, language is not monolithic. Not all people in any given group choose the same words (or recognize themselves as part of the same group). So, ask people what language they prefer. Or let them lead the conversation, and follow the language they’re using. 

GLAAD created an Ally’s Guide to Terminology (pdf), which is a good starting place, if sparse. But it frames the question in terms of language for allies to use, which I appreciate. Finding the “right” language isn’t about being an insider to the group. 

The LGBT Center at UW-Madison made this helpful gender pronouns guide (pdf). Cultural centers are a great place to see how language is being used in a community — go to a few events, listen to speakers, look at handouts and posters, and you’ll get the richness of language in context. 

For actually what people are using themselves,  heath-bear said zines, which I totally agree with, and lots of folks have been saying Tumblr. Follow blogs where people talk about the identities you want to learn about. There are also projects like the Trans Oral History Project, where you can hear people talking about their experiences. 

There’s a subtext in this question, too…that it is possible to use the “wrong” language, or the “right” words in the wrong way. I do this *all the time*. It’s part of communicating! The important thing is to keep talking: to make a genuine apology, listen, and learn. 


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Sep 30, 2014
@ 11:50 pm
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RADICAL LIBRARIES @ THE ALLIED MEDIA CONFERENCE »

aperez:

image

Hi, so I finally was able to attend AMC this past June for the first time. It was way more informative and inspiring than either ALA or PLA for me. Since libraries perfectly fit the AMC’s mission of working “towards a more just, creative and collaborative world”, I would like to propose a…

This is gonna be UHMAZING. If you can pitch in as a coordinator, let aperez know.


Photoset

Sep 30, 2014
@ 12:01 pm
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incidentalcomics:

Just a reminder to play Haruki Murakami Bingo today - “Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage” is out in the US! 

The bingo board photos and handmade pieces are courtesy of Los Angeles-based painter (and Murakami/Incidental Comics reader) Hunter Nesbitt. Thanks Hunter!

(via prairielights)


Photo

Sep 29, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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knowhomo:

LGBTQ* History You May Not Know
Lisa Ben & Vice Versa

Photo Source

And they’ve got copies at the ONE Archives at USC.

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* History You May Not Know

Lisa Ben & Vice Versa

Photo Source

And they’ve got copies at the ONE Archives at USC.


Text

Sep 28, 2014
@ 12:48 pm
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54 notes

Signal Boost: Over the Rainbow Committee needs members!

**Please reblog!!**

For the past three years, I’ve been part of the American Library Association GLBT Roundtable’s Over the Rainbow committee. I’m currently the chair. This committee exists to create a bibliography of queer books for adults that come out every year, to help librarians doing collection development. They are recruiting new members to start in January 2015. 

The truth: if you join this committee, you will be inundated with review copies of gay books. Many of them are faaaaaantastic. Some of them will make you cry or pee your pants laughing. Some of them will not be your cup of tea. Still, serving on this committee is an opportunity to make queer voices more visible in libraries, and also to see the variety of queer books being published. It is also a way to get involved in ALA or the GLBTRT, if that’s something you’re into. 

If you’re interested in applying, the details are here, the deadline is October 15. You do need to be a member of ALA, and of the GLBTRT. It’s a two-year commitment. It is highly encouraged for you to come to Midwinter, but you can also attend virtually, if you don’t make it in person. I am happy to talk with anyone who is considering applying. Not gonna lie, you have to read A LOT, but if you already read a lot of queer books, why not? 

**Please reblog!!**


Photoset

Sep 28, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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theartofgooglebooks:

Bookplates (1, 2, 3, 4).


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Sep 27, 2014
@ 2:57 pm
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lecieltumultueux:

I haven’t had this happen to me (yet), but I’m curious: what’s your go-to response when someone comes up to the desk and tells you to smile?

The “someone” is only ever a (white, older) man, in my experience. I do what I always do, which is just ask how I can help them. 

Has anyone had experiences with people of other genders doing this? 


Photoset

Sep 27, 2014
@ 12:01 pm
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publicdomainreview:

Double-page spreads from Adriaen Coenen’s Visboek (Fish Book), an epic 800+ page tome on all things fish and fish-related. See more at: http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/adriaen-coenens-fish-book-1580/


Photoset

Sep 26, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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mhc-asc:

It Aint Me Babe

Womens Liberation

1970

THE FIRST AMERICAN COMIC BOOK PRODUCED ENTIRELY BY WOMEN

Trina Robbins, Lisa Lyons, and Michele Brand, and other collaborating artists

 

This is a first edition, early print of the first American comic brook produced entirely by women.  It was a part of an underground publication of the Berkeley-based Women’s Liberation Basement Press.  This week is National Banned Books Week.  In 2014 we’re drawing attention to the controversies surrounding comic books as reading material.

 

This is a treasure from the Archives and Special Collections.  Visit it live in the treasure case in the reading room.  To find out more visit us online or in person in the cellar of Dwight!  And don’t miss the LITS Banned Books events this week.